Archive of ‘Book Reviews’ category

No god But God Review: Let’s Talk about Islam

I finished reading Reza Aslan’s book No god But God. It was a recommendation from John Green’s Gift Guide last year. It’s a fascinating read, but also kind of sad that someone would need to argue that a religion practiced by 2.2 billion people isn’t inherently evil, sexist, intolerant, etc. When I told a friend…

Misery, Marriage, and Middlemarch

This is another 25 minute essay. It’s not as in depth as some of my other reviews, and more like some slap dash thoughts. SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS Do not read any further if you do not want to be spoiled by George Eliot’s 1871-2 masterpiece Middlemarch: A Provincial Life. If you ever want to read…

25 Minutes of Middlemarch: The Bigness of Small Things

Apologies for the lack of posts lately. I’ve been busy with a forecast of only getting busier, but I still like writing and would like to continue doing so. I’m starting a new post type centered around the idea of 25 minutes. It can take a few hours for me to write a blog post…

Lost and Found in Furiously Happy

Jenny Lawson’s Furiously Happy dances upon broad generalizations. When I first picked it up, I was like, “Ah! Another shitty day book!” It is like retreating into a pillow fort with your zany friend where she will regale you with hair-raising tales that will make you blush and giggle. But then there another parts that…

Pompeii: Aqueduct Engineer Vs Volcano

I swallowed Robert Harris’ Pompeii last week, and no, it’s not the same story as the Kit Harrington gladiator movie with the same title. Pompeii is a novel about a new aqueduct engineer, Marcus Attilius Primus, who’s recently been shipped in from Rome after the last engineer mysteriously went missing. The other people on the…

Slow Start But Rich Finish For Michael Chabon’s Summerland

I’ve written about Michael Chabon’s Summerland in my Friday Favorites last week and spent a long time enumerating its flaws. It’s a lot to ask of readers to wade through a good two hundred pages before we even get introduced to the bulk of the cast. But once it gets going, it chugs along merrily.…

Why Smart People Make Financial Mistakes

Gary Belsky and Thomas Gilovich’s 1999 book Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes is more popular science than advice. For those looking for another personal finance book, continue looking, because this book is mostly about behavioral economics and common internal biases. If you’re a fan of Freakonomics and Planet Money, it’s a coin toss…

How to Be A Millionaire According to Stanley and Danko

The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy was first published in 1996 and spews good ol’ American values of frugality and thrift. If you’ve been following me on my personal finance journey, you’ll know that a million dollars is actually a fairly reasonable amount if you’re planning to have a comfortable twenty,…

David Brooks’ The Social Animal Review

I didn’t enjoy reading David Brook’s The Social Animal even though it’s a clever book. It crams behavioral economics, popular psychology, anthropology, cultural studies, and a bit of philosophy into the narrative of a made up couple named Erica and Harold. Even when the science gets tedious, I’d skip ahead to see how Erica and…

The Smartest Money Book You’ll Ever Read

I may have spoke too soon about Ramit Sethi’s I Will Teach You to Be Rich, because Daniel R. Solin’s The Smartest Money Book You’ll Ever Read is dull in comparison even though it goes over much of the same information. Daniel R. Solin has an entire series of “The Smartest” books in relationship to…

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